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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
so as i'm doing this i'm going to go ahead and close out. i want to thank you for joining us today. it's been a real joy bringing you this program. so keep painting, stay inspired, and i hope to see you real soon on another yarnell school of fine art. >> hello and welcome to the "journal" here on dw. >> here's what's coming up in the next half-hour -- political deadlock in italy. what's next after an election that produces no clear winner? >> a trip down memory lane for the new u.s. secretary of state on a visit to germany. >> and a step closer to bundesliga. berlin get an important win. and that italy faces political deadlock after the country's national elections produced no clear winner. no single party was able to secure a majority in both houses of parliament. >> the center-left candidate is claiming a narrow victory, but it is not enough for him to build a government. >> former prime minister silvio berlusconi came in a close second. coalition talks are under way, but many italians are unsure they will produce a stable government. >> italian voters have elected new representa
us. international leaders are gathering in bavaria for the annual munich security conference. the german defense minister opened the conference by focusing on the current conflicts in syria and moly -- mali and emphasizing the importance of ongoing cooperation between europe and the united states. them in the united nations has been gridlocked over syria for months, and often, these occasions provide a more informal opportunity for an exchange of ideas. one of the most prominent speakers will be vice president joe biden of the u.s., and he stopped off in berlin on the way to the meeting. >> the u.s. vice-president peter were when visit to the german capital and his first to the german chancellery. he held an equally brief press conference after talks with chancellor merkel, giving high praise for trans-atlantic relations. the two reportedly discussed conflicts in syria and moly -- mali but made no public statements on the matter. his next stop is munich for an annual security conference, a meeting of high-ranking international policy makers, and mali and syria will be at the
memory lane for the new u.s. secretary of state on a visit to germany. >> and a step closer to bundesliga. berlin get an important win. and that italy faces political deadlock after the country's national elections produced no clear winner. no single party was able to secure a majority in both houses of parliament. >> the center-left candidate is claiming a narrow victory, but it is not enough for him to build a government. >> former prime minister silvio berlusconi came in a close second. coalition talks are under way, but many italians are unsure they will produce a stable government. >> italian voters have elected new representatives, but where does that leave the country? newspaper headlines are skating. one reads -- the only winner is ungovernability. there's already talk of free elections. >> i do not know what to say. i think we voters are being taken for a ride. >> i have no idea what will happen now. they will reach some kind of decision. everything is in the hands of four or five people again. they just do what they want. >> italy's political landscape is in turmoil. the central
be little threat to human health. our correspondent, joining us from our parliamentary to you. we have politicians across is that going to be enough to clear this up? th>> these tests should certainy go some way in making consumers feel more confident about the meat products they are buying throughout the european union. ironically, two weeks ago, the british food safety association started testing for chemicals in horse meat sparked by this mixup of beef and horse meat scandal and promptly found traces of chemicals, including those mentioned in the report, which was typically used in resources. this unearthed a completely different scandal, and at the same time showed that the effectiveness of tests is rather limited because that the tested positive and was then exported to france where it might have entered the human food chain. the city will make testing faster but also said that limits were increasingly seeing that it might be a case of europe-wide fraud, so it might soon not be a question of food safety but on how to tackle criminality. >> the question does remain -- how could it
, this is still a very sad time for the family of reeva and for us all. we are grateful that the magistrate recognized the validity and the strength of our application. as the family, we are convinced that oscars version of what happened on that terrible night will be proved to be true. >> the prosecution says pistorius is a flight risk. he is looking at the possibility of years behind bars. that was not enough to keep him behind bars. pistorius left the courthouse in the jeep. he had to hand over his passport and collection of guns to the police. the trial is set to start on june 4. >> let's go live to pretoria, south africa and up to a reporter who was in the courtroom as the decision was read out today. we've heard the audio. can you describe what you saw? >> [no audio] the granting of bail [inaudible] someone expected, but oscar pistorius [inaudible] when the actual reading came down, pistorius himself was largely impassive. it was really his family members who started celebrating the ruling. we were expecting something from him. perhaps he just had very little emotion to give at that p
>>> glad to have you with us on this edition of "newsline." it's day, february 12. i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. >>> millions of roman catholics around the world are coming to terms with an announcement from their spiritual leader that's both surprising and rare. pope benedict xvi says he's too old to do his job and is stepping down at the end of the month. he is 85. spokespersons for the vatican said the pope cited his advancing age and felt he could no longer fulfill his responsibilities. german cardinal yosef razinger was 75 years old when he became pope following the death of pope john paul ii. benedict xvi was a conservative pope. he strongly worked for his control. he faced the generation and joined twitter last year. he took his turn on handling sexual abuse scandals to an investigation of money launderring in the vatican city. he accused his butler of stealing and leaking documents that pointed to corruption in the vatican. the pope pardoned him over christmas. it's rare for a pope to resign. pope benedict is the first to quit in nearly 600 years. senior members of th
an account and then wait for the money to come in, i guess. >> she's also using the site to raise money for an ice-skating show she's planning. >> we've seen a lot of teenagers raising money for really interesting projects on fundly. you can raise money for a team, you can raise money for a school, you can raise money for a friend who's in need, you can raise money for medical expenses. >> that's why more and more organizations are using crowdfunding. you can put up links for information and upload photos and video. if you have a good cause, it's a way to reach out far beyond your own community. >> we've seen teenagers say, "you know what? this year for my birthday, don't give me presents. i want to raise money for a cause that i really care about." >> but keep this in mind -- most crowdfunding sites make money by taking a commission on each donation you get. so your first move is to find out just how much their service is going to cost. that's why it's a good idea to get some guidance from a parent or other trusted adult. >> there's still lots ahead, so stay with us. >> we'll be right
banking giant as it post more than 2 billion euros in quarterly losses. >> and tornadoes batter six u.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are anal
'll tell you why one presidential monument includes a statue of his dog. >> so join us now for this week's "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids ns." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm siena. we'll start with our top story. >> whether you've already got your driver's license, a learner's permit, or are still just a passenger, you're probably quite aware that the cost of gasoline has gone up a lot in recent years, and that's causing many people to rethink the cars they drive. carina reports on one answer to the high cost of gas -- electricity. >> the first cars appeared in the late 1700s. they were powered by steam, like locomotives. but soon, these horseless carriages moved to using what's called an internal combustion engine. basically, that means they ran by burning fossil fuel. and ever since, internal combustion engines have run on... >> gas. >> gas? >> gasoline? >> yes, gasoline. or its cousin, diesel fuel. but gas and diesel pollute. so carmakers tried electricity. that didn't work so well. one of the problems was the battery. they just couldn't make a battery powerful enough to make an
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for some time to come. u.s. transportation investigators have cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. officials from a number of agencies are looking into a string of safety incidents. debra hersman chaired the u.s. national transportation safety board. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire on a jet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they didn't place them far enough apart so trouble in one could affect the others. they have not determined why the batteries short circuiteded. another battery fire forced the pilot of an all nipon airways pilot to make an emergency landing in japan.
injured. >> what about the asteroid? it is big enough for us to know about it. what is the likelihood something like that could hit the earth? >> objects of this size probably hit the earth about once every couple of hundred years. the last known impact was the event that happened in russia and siberia, flattening many square meters of forest and also two people were killed due to fires. >> what can we do to protect ourselves against that kind of threat? >> we are now starting to catalogued objects like the bigger one. the meter-sized objects, we have no chance to detect them early, but the bigger objects are now being catalogued and traced, but there is no technology at the moment to really stop them from hitting the earth. >> thank you very much. >> all right, back down to earth now and on to other news. track and field superstar oscar pistorius says he is not guilty of murder. >> the south african runner appeared in court today when he was officially charged with shooting his " friend said. he will remain in custody until a bail hearing on tuesday. >> oscar pistorius is used to med
. there has been turmoil on the streets since the killing of secular leader chokri belaid. police used tear gas on protesters when they came close to the ministry. protesters say the ruling party is behind the assassination of the political leader, gunned down outside his home on wednesday. a senior official said it had not consulted with his party. before the opposition, it was not enough. a spokesman from the popular front party said the government had to go. >> everybody agrees the government has failed. it no longer has a role to play. we demand its resignation and the creation of a new government that will guide the country through a transitional period. >> friday will see belaid's funeral as well as a general strike called by the country's main trade union. >> what can be done to ease the tensions in tunisia? for more, let's go to our correspondent in tunis. first off, no signs of compromise right now. what happens? >> they have been meeting today, and we are still waiting for a declaration from them. in the meantime, i am at the presidential palace where the spokesman for the preside
spending at companies went down 2.6%. >>> financial leaders in the u.s. are facing their own set of challenges. president obama nominated his chief of staff to be his next treasury secretary. and now jack lew is outlining what he sees ahead for the economy. ai uchida joins us now from the business desk. ai, good morning. >> good morning, catherine. jack lew, he has to win over the democrats and the republicans before he can be treasury secretary. so he's asking lawmakers for bipartisan support on fiscal reform. he says this is needed to keep the u.s. economy on the path to recovery. lew spoke to senators on wednesday. he's seeking their approval for his appointment to obama's second-term cabinet. lew said he's resolved to reduce the nation's huge budget deficit. he asked both democrats and republicans to work together to avoid automatic spending cut march on defense and other programs. >> we must put our nation back on a path of fiscal sustainability. we cannot allow the series of harmful automatic spending cuts known as the sequester to go into effect. these cuts would impose se
correspondence sent us this summary of tuesday's trading from the frankfurt stock exchange -- our correspondent said us this summer. >> some shares were strongly in demand while others found themselves deeply on the downside. some of the tightening rules might make strong banks even stronger, and that banks could profit which have many corporate clients and many international clients. stock market in general this tuesday managed to recover somewhat from the losses of the beginning of the week, also due to positive economic data. the german engineering sector managed to post a significant increase of factory orders again. >> a look now at the raw numbers from the markets. the dax ended the day of a bit, more than 0.3%. euro stoxx 50 rose nearly a full percentage point. the dow jones is up 0.87%, and the euro is trading against the dollar at $1.3579. >> the u.s. justice department is suing standard and poor's for its alleged role in the 2008 financial crisis. wall street investors say they were expecting the move. in 2007, the ratings agency made its fortune by giving high credit ratings to worth
-hour -- >> in his state of the union address, u.s. president barack obama proposes fresh negotiations on a transatlantic free trade agreement. >> pope benedict celebrates his last public mass as pontiff inside st. peter's basilica in rome. >> and the movie "night train to lisbon" has its world premiere at the berlin film festival. president barack obama says the american economy has made important progress, but there is still a long way to go. he delivered the annual state of the union address in washington last night and urged americans to help jump-start the country's sluggish -- sluggish economy. >> pushing hard for a special economy would significant job growth. that looks like the message obama plans to hammer home time and time again during his time in office. >> presidents also touched on foreign policy, praising u.s. soldiers stationed in afghanistan and promising them a speedy return home. >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> it is a washington ritual, long applause, handshakes, and hugs on both sides of the aisle. in his speech, obama focused clearly on domes
." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> it used to be a sign of being cool. but america's smoking habits have been changing over the years. emily reports that teens are helping lead the way. >> no, i don't smoke cigarettes. i actually had an aunt. i'd always take her cigarettes and hide them from her. and like, it just -- i was just never a cigarette type. >> i don't smoke cigarettes because i think it's gross and you get lung cancer, and i don't want lung cancer. >> i don't smoke because there's no point to it. it's addictive. it doesn't help you. there's no point. >> the number of american teens who smoke has been going down for years. in fact, we're less likely to use tobacco than the teens in many other countries. surveys show that only about 12% of all 10th graders have smoked recently. but that's still too many. >> nicotine addiction, take one. >> that's why the government puts out messages like this one. >> [ coughs ] boy, that smoke is really obnoxious. do you think that guy knows how bad smoking is for him? >> these pool players know what they're ta
had told the u.s. government about the test beforehand. and even china, north korea's sole ally, has urged pyongyang to stop before it makes matters worse. >> tensions are high in south korea. protesters denounced north korea's nuclear tests. north korean state media claim the country had exploded a more powerful bomb than it had been able to build a earlier. diplomats at the united nations security council emergency meeting also expressed alarm. >> countries around the world, including every member of this security council, agreed that this test was an extremely regrettable act that further undermines international peace and security. >> many countries will likely impose new sanctions against north korea, but observers say that china has the most leverage. >> for china, it will depend on showing that north korea has gone too far this time and it will not go without consequences for the north korean-chinese relationship. i expect that china will also decide on painful sanctions for north korea. >> china is north korea's protector, but p'yongyang carried out the nuclear test not far f
top story. >> a lot of us join walkathons because we have a personal connection to the cause. but as emily reports, one boy's connection is not only personal, it's amazing. >> there's always excitement when an event like this is about to begin. the crowds, the signs, the different groups with their team shirts. >> let's go! [ cheers and applause ] >> this one-mile march is to raise money for the maria fareri children's hospital in new york's westchester county. it's also raising awareness about the need for transplant donors. that's why it's so special that 11-year-old tyler is here. this is not the first walkathon for tyler. the last time he joined this event, he was just hours from undergoing surgery for a new liver. >> i was really sick, you know? so i had to get a liver transplant. >> tyler had been battling a liver disease for years, and it was getting worse. to get a donated liver, you need to be on a national list. for tyler, time was running out. the hospital's medical team worked hard to get him moved to the top of the list. even so, the wait took more than a year. >
. >> earlier, we talked to journalists -- a journalist who was in the courtroom. he told us how the case is being received. >> as it is internationally, we have the sitting cabinet minister in court today appearing at the hearing. it has been one of the biggest media events south africa has seen. correspondents from every part of the world are here following the story. this comes at a time when south africa is involved in deep introspection in terms of violence against women. we are still reeling from shock at a particularly brutal rape case recently, so the debate around murder and rape of women is really at the forefront at the moment, and i think that is playing a big role in the general depiction of this case. >> tunisia's prime minister has resigned a day after his bid to set up a government of technocrats failed. it was opposed by other members of his governing party. then he announced his resignation after a meeting with the president. he had proposed the non-partisan government as a way out of the political crisis sparked by the opposition of a leading opposition figure. >> the g
to the killing. >> we are still waiting for reaction. can you give us some background? how much has tunisian been destabilized by this assassination? >> i would not say that tunisia has been destabilized. most citizens are just carrying on their lives as usual, but in political circles, it certainly seems quite a big event today. >> thanks so very much. moving on to some other news, society has been struggling to keep up for decades, and sometimes developments outpaced our ability to apprehend all the consequences. >> take artificial insemination, which gave rise to sperm donors. for years, mothers who used the services thought laws enacted at the time was forever prevent their children from discovering the identity of their biological father, but in germany, a court has ruled that knowing who dad is is a fundamental right. >> the woman who brought the case says she is not interested in claiming money from her biological father. her reasons are personal. the court agreed she has the right to know who her biological father is a. >> the plaintiff has the right to know where she comes from. it is a
for the poope. his decision to resign ahas received extreme action. joining us is our -- has received a mixed reaction. >> joining us is our conflict from -- our contact from rome. is there cause for concern? >> i think there is cause for some concern. that's why he promised in his last address to the cardinals -- he promised reverence and obedience. it's also why he is hiding away behind the walls of vatican city states and not returning to his beloved the very a in southern germany for his retirement -- beloved of area -- beloved bugbear yet -- beloved bavaria in southern germany. the new pope has to be charismatic, forceful, has to put his own stamp very quickly on the papacy. >> who will be in charge of the catholic church until the new pope is elected? >> the cardinal will take care of the daily running of the church. no major decision will be made until a new pope is elected. >> everybody is wanting to know when that will be. when do you think they will start sitting down to elect a new pope? >> i wish i knew. the pope has made it possible for the cardinals to meet earlier than planned.
, but the underlying cause is a problem with the body's immune system. >> immune system works to protect us from infections, like bacteria or viruses or parasites, but sometimes, it gets confused, and it starts recognizing foods as an enemy, and it starts mounting an immune response. >> that response can range from itching to rashes called hives, vomiting, even difficulty breathing. very severe symptoms are called anaphylaxis. anaphylaxis is not only scary -- it can be deadly, and it can happen in an instant. >> your throat closes. hives all over your body. your eyes puff up. it's different for everybody, really, but it gets really fatal. [ siren wails ] >> every 10 minutes, someone in the u.s. is rushed to the emergency room with a severe allergic reaction. what's more, food allergies are becoming more common. peanut allergies alone have tripled since our parents were kids. >> i have a friend who's allergic to almonds. >> my friends are allergic to nuts, berries, and milk. >> my best friend is allergic to peanuts. >> one of my friends, she's allergic to peanuts. [ mid-tempo piano music playing
it is willing to negotiate peace deal under u.s. and russian guidance, but it said any talks will not include president assad. i asked our correspondent with the chances are that this meeting will produce anything. >> basically, the syrian opposition is trying to put its house in order. the head of the national coalition was offered a few days ago talks with people of the regime that do not have blood on their hands. it is not everyone in the opposition agreeing with the opposition, especially the islamists and muslim brotherhood. the big question would be also if this proposal will be accepted by the various militant groups in syria where the syrian opposition outside really does not have control. >> thank you very much. >> i just past two years, syria has become the middle east coast and most troubled and dangerous region. >> its government is shrinking if not falling apart. militias are rising in power, and the entire world is well aware that syria has chemical weapons and a strong alliance with iran. from lebanon to israel, from cairo to washington, worries are greater than ever that syri
time, and i hope you'll be able to join us. we love to keep hearing from you. so god bless you, stay inspired, keep painting, and i promise to see you right here real soon on another yarnell school of fine art. >> you are watching the "journal" from berlin. >> these are our top stories -- pope benedict bids farewell to huge crowds the day before he formally steps down as leader of the italian catholic church. >> the italian prime minister cancels an appointment with germany's main opposition candidate. >> in german soccer, dortmund prepared to defend their title against high-flying bayern munich. it seemed that the lord was sleeping -- that was today's emotional farewell message from pope benedict xvi as he acknowledged the rough seas that marked his time as head of the catholic church. >> it was his final public address before retiring, speaking to pins -- tens of thousands of faithful, he referred to the struggles enjoy of his papacy. >> we will be going live to rome in a moment to get more detail on the speech, but first, a closer look, and the momentous day for catholics around t
could offer him to help out at home? >> not very much. she used the words solidarity, support, expressing sympathy for the unemployed, particularly the young people. the figures are something like 56% of young that people are unemployed, the highest in europe. she believes there is no way around the painful reforms to get the spanish economy back on course. >> john, thank you ever so much. >> german efforts to get more young people into job training and expand all of the steel workers are falling short. the country's industrial base cannot find enough workers. >> applicants have little trouble finding work. including in your report in the oecd, many countries are short of low and medium skilled workers. >> the german business sector needs a low and medium skilled workers, but that is a hurdle immigrants have to jump and they are way too high. their reluctance to look outside the borders and that threatens business. >> if germany does not do this in the right way. if this effort does not results, that would be a really negative impact on potential growth and the real economic g
by the european parliament. >> our brussels correspondent has been covering the summit for us. let's bring her in now. this is a real first, this cut. where will we see budget reductions being made? >> spending in areas such as infrastructure, energy, transport, but also scientific research will be reduced. also, eu officials will see pay slightly reduced, which means that a key demand by great britain's prime minister david cameron has been met. agriculture subsidies are also taking a slight head, but overall, they are still the biggest chunk of eu spending. >> some analysts already say this budget means less europe. what are you hearing at the summit? >> it became clear from the start that eu leaders to come here to these tough negotiations in brussels defending their own national interests, and, of course, the european parliament is not happy with the proposal on the table now. they are saying that the brunt of the cut is happening in areas that are future oriented. much disagreeing with what the european council president has said. they said we would be more spending in areas that could po
as low as the pocket money of a primary school kid? nothing has changed for us. >> the climate has changed slightly because greece leaving the eurozone is no longer on the table. things have calmed down. >> analysts say more austerity cuts could lead to a further drop in consumer spending by the end of the year. >> the biggest question for greece is how people will cope with the pension cuts and tax hikes over the coming four months. >> greeks are now hoping that the worst of the crisis is over. analysts say recovery should kick in by 2014 at the latest. >> for more in the greek economy and today's protests, we go live to athens to our correspondent. what is happening there now? what has the mood been like on the streets today? >> the protests have basically died out now. what happened during the day was pretty much a rerun of about 20 general strikes there have been since the greeks went into the spiral of the economy about a year ago. a few hours later, there was, as you mentioned, clashes between police and small numbers of demonstrators, but i would say there was not quite as b
, is a question that concerns all of us sooner or later. the latest, of course, is when we are confronted by death. he does not do it in a way that necessarily appeals to a mass audience. that, of course, is a certain weakness in his position. he tends to be rather intellectual. people who are prepared to look into the questions of the meaning of life, that there's more to life than simply having fun -- of course, having fun is important, but if there is more to life than that, more than one in from one life style and into the next and amassing material goods -- then there is a great deal of food for thought in his writings. i think that will be his major legacy. >> some people believe there is much more to the pope's resignation and frail health, that the scandals that rocked the church played a big role. what is your take on that? >> i think there is a connection. i think that the scandal within the church, predictably of child abuse, has weighed very heavily on him. one has seen him age quite dramatically, and i think that that is probably also the concern and the pain that he has felt. on the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)

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